This is a war hero. This C-47 "Skytrain," tail 476717, flew over Normandy on D-Day. (Air Cache photo/John M. Guilfoil)

This is a war hero. This C-47 “Skytrain,” tail 476717, flew over Normandy on D-Day. (Air Cache photo/John M. Guilfoil)

WESTOVER AIR RESERVE BASE — Day one brought 110,000 people to the Great New England Airshow, according to the Springfield Republican newspaper.

One of the first sights to behold: The warbirds. Several legendary planes, including the F-4U, P-47, P-51, B-25 for starters. There were also some lesser-known planes on the ground, like a NAVION A, a Piper Cub UC-83, a Grumman/General Motors TBF/TBM “Avenger,” and a Boeing-Stearman Model 75 biplane.

These airplanes are kept alive thanks to the veterans and hobbyists who restore and maintain them. If you are a lover of military history, you should admire these people because most of our historic relics get destroyed. The Navy has been destroying its F-14 “Tomcats” to keep parts out of Iranian hands. The original USS Enterprise aircraft carrier (CV-6) with its record 20 World War II battle stars, was scrapped in the 1958s.

One correction to the Springfield newspaper of record, however. The paper makes reference to the B-52, which was parked in all its glory at the airshow. But the newspaper says that the B-52 was “widely used in World War II.” The B-52 did not make its first flight until 1952 and did not fight in WWII.

There were more than 60 airplanes on hand for the show Saturday. It was good, considering that neither the Air Force Thunderbirds nor the Navy Blue Angels were on-hand. In addition to the B-52, a B-1 “Lancer” was parked, and you never forget how it feels the first time a B-2 “Spirit” stealth bomber flies over you. It’s gripping. We will be posting photo galleries throughout the weekend and early next week. You’ll see some of the three A-10s, two F/A-18s, F-15s (photos added), and the massive C-5 “Galaxy,” the cargo jet operated by Westover’s 337th Airlift Squadron.